Bay State buys stake in gluten-free oats supplier

by Jeff Gelski
Share This:
Search for similar articles by keyword: [Bay State Milling], [Gluten-Free], [Oats]

Gluten-free oats
MGM Seed & Grain is building a dedicated gluten-free oat processing facility in Saskatoon, Sask.
 

QUINCY, MASS. — Bay State Milling Co. has acquired a stake in MGM Seed & Grain, which is building a dedicated gluten-free oat processing facility in Saskatoon, Sask. The partnership with MGM, based in Saskatoon, will allow Bay State Milling to provide its customers with a secure supply chain of gluten-free oat products, including rolled, quick and steel-cut oats as well as oat flour. All products will be available in both conventional and organic forms.

“Bay State Milling has been a great partner, and we are excited about the potential to leverage their milling, marketing and distribution capabilities,” said Ron Blazeiko, president of MGM Seed & Grain.

Bay State Milling provides an array of ingredients, including wheat and rye flours, durum semolina, whole milled flours, ancient grains, edible seeds, grain and flour blends, and sweet spices.

Walker Humphries, Bay State Milling
Walker Humphries, vice-president of strategic planning for Bay State Milling

“We are excited about the opportunity to work with MGM Seed & Grain to develop a secure supply chain of gluten-free oats,” said Walker Humphries, vice-president of strategic planning for Quincy-based Bay State Milling. “This venture underscores Bay State’s commitment to provide healthy and flavorful ingredients to support the growth of emerging grain-based food categories.”

People with celiac disease must avoid gluten in their diet. Oats in their natural form do not contain the gluten protein, according to Beyond Celiac, Ambler, Pa., which seeks to drive diagnosis, advance research and accelerate the discovery of new treatments and a cure for celiac disease. Cross-contamination, however, may occur in fields where oats are grown and mills that produce and store oats may also grow and manufacture wheat, barley or rye, according to Beyond Celiac. 
Comment on this Article
We welcome your thoughtful comments. Please comply with our Community rules.

 

 


The views expressed in the comments section of Baking Business News do not reflect those of Baking Business News or its parent company, Sosland Publishing Co., Kansas City, Mo. Concern regarding a specific comment may be registered with the Editor by clicking the Report Abuse link.