DSM targets gluten-free bread with enzymes launch

by Jeff Gelski
Share This:
Search for similar articles by keyword: [DSM], [Gluten-Free], [Bread]

 

DELFT, THE NETHERLANDS — DSM has introduced a range of baking enzymes designed for gluten-free bread and other wheat-free applications, the Delft-based company said June 15. DSM also released the findings from its consumer insights research on gluten-free bread.

DSM will showcase the new enzymes at IFT17, the Institute of Food Technologists’ annual meeting and food exposition June 25-28 in Las Vegas.

Fokke van den Berg, DSM
Fokke van den Berg, business line manager for baking enzymes at DSM

“Baking enzymes are widely used by bakeries because they allow them to develop not only better-textured, more appetizing bread, but also make it possible for them to leave out undesired ingredients in the bread-making process,” said Fokke van den Berg, business line manager for baking enzymes at DSM. “However, gluten-free bread makers have previously had limited options to harness these benefits since most enzymes used in the baking industry have been formulated on wheat flour, making them impossible to use in gluten-free applications. We are excited to offer the industry specialized enzyme solutions for gluten-free, label-friendly bread, enabling a better eating experience, whatever the consumer preference.”

Sensory panel tests performed in May demonstrated gluten-free bread baked with the new enzymes resulted in softer, moister and more cohesive bread, according to DSM. The enzymes also may be used in other applications, including corn tortillas, rye bread and spelt bread.

DSM’s research on consumer insights involved the United States and the United Kingdom. Results showed 66% of U.S. consumers and 63% of U.K. consumers said they thought softness in gluten-free bread should be improved. Sixty-three per cent of U.S. consumers and 59% of U.K. consumers said they thought moistness should be improved.

Gluten-free banana bread
 In the United States, 56% said they eat mostly gluten-free bread.
 

The survey found a majority of people who eat gluten-free bread also eat regular bread. In the United States, 56% said they eat mostly gluten-free bread, 25% said they eat mostly other bread and 19% said they eat only gluten-free bread. In the United Kingdom, 46% said they eat mostly gluten-free bread, 31% said they eat mostly other bread and 23% said they eat only gluten-free bread.

When asked how often they eat gluten-free bread, 43% of U.S. consumers said weekly, 37% said daily, 11% said monthly and 8% said less than monthly. The percentages for U.K. consumers were 38% for weekly, 35% for daily, 17% for monthly and 11% for less than monthly.

Health benefits, at 31% for U.S. consumers and 20% for U.K. consumers, were given as the key driver for gluten-free consumption. Following health benefits were easier to digest (15% for U.S. and 13% for U.K.), gluten intolerance/sensitivity (12% for U.S. and 16% for U.K.) and a family member eats it (10% for U.S. and 12% for U.K.). 
Comment on this Article
We welcome your thoughtful comments. Please comply with our Community rules.

 

 


The views expressed in the comments section of Baking Business News do not reflect those of Baking Business News or its parent company, Sosland Publishing Co., Kansas City, Mo. Concern regarding a specific comment may be registered with the Editor by clicking the Report Abuse link.