When disruptive is good for the market

by Dan Malovany
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In the bread aisle, where a sea of sameness often prevails, Dave’s Killer Bread strives to break with convention and stir up the waters, noted John Tucker, president and chief executive officer. The company just announced its line of bread achieved certification from Non-GMO Project Verified.

“We’re a nonconformist company,” he explained a few months ago to Baking & Snack magazine. “We see ourselves as being disruptive and willing to take risks.”

More recently, Boulder Brands’ c.e.o. Steve Hughes said the next three to five years are going to be disruptive for some and “cataclysmic” for others in the food industry. Mr. Hughes defined disruptive brands as those that were “born in Whole Foods, raised in Whole Foods, crossed over to natural, (and are) now crossing over to conventional.”

For some, it’s “a phenomenal opportunity because the consumer has already moved,” Mr. Hughes noted during the Barclays Back-To-School Consumer Conference earlier this month. Companies, he added, must ask who is in front of the curve and who is behind? He thinks those companies with disruptive brands are definitely ahead of the pack. These days, disruptive is apparently a good thing in the market.
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